Research

Job Market Paper

Does Intelligence Shield Children from the Effects of Parental Unemployment?
Job Market Paper
  • Nurfatima Jandarova
The negative effect of parental job loss on various outcomes of children is well-documented. In this paper, I provide new evidence on how these effects change with the intelligence of children. I find that higher intelligence mitigates some of the impacts, but not all. Parental unemployment is more harmful to the education of children at the top of the distribution. This forces them to start their careers at lower-paying jobs and continues to weigh down on their wages even later in life. Nevertheless, higher intelligence alleviates the effect on labour supply, job ranking and monthly earnings over time. I also provide suggestive evidence that the results may be driven by the loss of income and/or psychological distress following the unemployment of parents.

Work in progress

Multiple Imputation of University Degree Attainment
Work in progress
Historically higher education in the UK has been shaped by a dual system: elite universities on the one hand and polytechnics and other higher education institutions on the other. Despite the for- mal equivalence of both degrees, the two institution types faced different financing, target populations, admission procedures and subjects taught. Nevertheless, in survey data they are often indis- tinguishable. In this paper, we differentiate the institution types among degree-holders using a multiple imputation technique in the UKHLS and BHPS datasets. We examine the validity of inference based on imputed values using Monte Carlo simulations. We also verify that the imputed values are consistent with university graduation rates computed using the universe of undergraduate students in the UK.

(draft available upon request)
    Presented at
  • EUI Microeconometrics working group (February 2020)
Selection and Roy Model
Work in progress
In this paper we examine the evolution of genotypes over the past 11,000 years in the framework of two-sector Roy model. We incorporate a standard Roy model where individuals self-select into one of the two occupations (agriculture or hunter-gathering) based on their types (intelligence scores) into the model of genetic evolution with selection and mutation. As a result, genotypes associated with a more productive sector experience positive selective push. We fit the model to the genotype data of modern and ancient individuals. We test the hypothesis that distribution of genotypes shifted in the direction favouring higher intelligence in the past 11,000 years after agriculture became more productive than hunter-gathering.

(draft available upon request)
Fertility Choice and Intelligence in Developed Countries
Work in progress
We document that fertility may be negatively associated, at least in advanced societies, with higher intelligence, particularly for women. An explanation of the finding is provided in a model describing the choice of individuals (in particular women) facing a trade-off between parenthood and career concerns. With positive complementarity between intelligence and effort in education and career advancement, higher intelligence individuals, particularly women, will sacrifice parenthood to education. Thus, current education and labor market policies may be imposing an uneven penalty on more talented women. We test and find support for the model in a large data set for the UK (Understanding Society), using several alternative measures of fertility. Our results provide a new interpretation of the well documented fact in demographic studies that education is negatively associated with fertility: it is not education as an outcome, but as an aspiration that reduces fertility.

(draft available upon request)
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